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Indigenous Peoples’ Week with U.S. Poet Laureate - Humboldt State Now

Indigenous Peoples’ Week with U.S. Poet Laureate

HSU's 27th annual Indigenous Peoples’ Week will feature virtual events that focus on indigenous policy, issues, and contributions and also expose the generational traumas resulting from the colonization of Indigenous peoples. Among the keynote speakers: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.

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U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. (Photo by Paul Abdoo, courtesy of Joy Harjo)

Starting on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Monday, Oct. 12, the 27th annual Indigenous Peoples’ Week (IPW) at Humboldt State will feature virtual events that focus on indigenous policy, issues, and contributions and also expose the generational traumas resulting from the colonization of Indigenous peoples.

Guests include Joy Harjo, an internationally renowned performer and writer of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation who was named the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States in 2019.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day was first adopted in 1992 by Berkeley, California in place of Columbus Day in order to bring awareness to the injustices that took place against Native Americans as a result of Columbus’s “discovering America.” More than 130 cities in 14 states, in addition to the District of Columbia, celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLESWEEK SCHEDULE

Monday, Oct. 12

Noon – 12:30 p.m.
IPW Kick Off
The Kick-off event will provide students an opportunity to launch the 27th Annual HSU Indigenous Peoples Week, a counter-celebration to the federal holiday Columbus Day.
Join the Zoom Meeting

1 – 2:30 p.m.
You’re on Indian Land: White Supremacist Roots of American Environmentalism
Join Kaitlin Reed (Yurok/Hupa/Oneida), professor of Native American Studies, and Katie Koscielak, sustainability analyst at HSU. This presentation is intended to teach participants about how the history of white supremacy in America intersects with notions of environmentalism, sustainability, and climate action.
Register here

Tuesday, Oct. 13
5 – 7 p.m.
Keynote Speaker: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo
Joy Harjo is an internationally renowned performer and writer of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and was named the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States in 2019. The author of nine books of poetry, several plays and children’s books, and a memoir, Crazy Brave, her many honors include the Ruth Lily Prize for Lifetime Achievement from the Poetry Foundation, the Academy of American Poets Wallace Stevens Award, a PEN USA Literary Award, Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund Writers’ Award, a Rasmuson U.S. Artist Fellowship, two NEA fellowships, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Harjo is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and is a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. She lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she is a Tulsa Artist Fellow. Read her full bio.
Please register in advance

Wednesday, Oct. 14
12 – 1:30 p.m.
Hijxs de la Malinche
Decolonizing “La Raza” through an Indigenous Feminist Lens with Gabriela Spears-Rico (P’urhepecha/Matlatzinca scholar and poet). This lecture will be recorded and posted to Native American Studies YouTube page.
Register here or join us on Facebook Live.

3 – 4 p.m.
Each / Other Sewing Circle
Hosted by Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery. Bring a handkerchief and sewing supplies and join us October 14 and 21 at 3 p.m. via Zoom.
Register here.

5 – 7 p.m.
Native Storyteller Gayle Ross
Gayle Ross is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and a direct descendant of John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee during the infamous “Trail of Tears”. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich Native American heritage that Gayle’s storytelling springs. During the past 25 years, Gayle has become one of the best-loved and most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form. Read her bio.
“Register here for the Zoom link”: https://humboldtstate.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYlc-6sqzstE9BjrAGEB_I8VyJOuR3Xn_5I.

Thursday, Oct. 15
3 – 4 p.m.
La Cultura Cura
Indigenous family strength with guest speaker Jerry Tello. An overview training on the indigenous, culturally-based philosophy of transformational health and healing.
Zoom link

Friday, Oct. 16

12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Corey Gray, Native Physicist
Corey Gray is an Indian Natural Resources, Science and Engineering Program (INRSEP) alumnus. Read more about him.
Contact ITEPP for Zoom link.

1:30 – 3 p.m.
Decolonizing Public History
Indigenous Resistance to the Memorialization of Genocide in the United States.
Event hosted by Brittani Orona (Hupa, Ph.D candidate at UC Davis), Charles Sepulveda (Tongva/Acjachemen, professor of Ethnic Studies at University of Utah), Kayla Begay (Hupa, professor of Native American Studies at HSU), Tia Oros Peters (Zuni, CEO of Seventh Generation Fund), Kaitlin Reed (HSU professor of Native American Studies will be moderator)
Register here. Or join us on Facebook Live!

4 – 5 p.m.
Decolonial Dance Break
HSU Indigenous Peoples’ Week and Native American Studies present Decolonial Dance Break with professor Cutcha Risling-Baldy. Come listen to some Indigenous artists to inspire your #Landback weekend groove.
Register here.