Check This Out: New Library Collection Features Our Very Own Authors - Humboldt State Now

Check This Out: New Library Collection Features Our Very Own Authors

Need the Karuk word for “seashore?” Want to know more about a local pipe organ builder? Craving a coming-of-age story about a tech geek growing up in the ‘80s?

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The Karuk word for seashore is “yurástiim,” according to the Karuk Dictionary. The dictionary will be part of the the Library’s new permanent collection of HSU authors.

HSU Library patrons can check out (and literally check out) these and other published creative works by HSU authors starting Thursday, Jan. 28, when the Library unveils its new permanent collection at the first annual HSU Authors Celebration.

The collection–located in a new section on the second floor of the Helen Everett Reading Room, called HSU Authors Hall–is the brainchild of Cyril Oberlander, Dean of the Library, who saw an opportunity to showcase works of HSU students, faculty, staff and alumni.

“The job of libraries is to engage and capture the imagination of students by creating a vibrant learning environment,” said Oberlander. “So the celebration recognizes not only authors, but also readers. Plus, I love to showcase books.”

The celebration mostly focuses on works from 2014, but it also showcases articles and creative works published over the years. There’s the “Humboldt Pipe Organ Builder” (1971) by George H. Sandin, for example, and Kevin Savetz’s “Terrible Tech” (2012). There’s also the Karuk Dictionary, co-edited by Assistant Librarian Susan Gehr.

“I’m really pleased to hear that my book was included in the Authors Hall collection,” said Gehr. “It’s another nudge to get to work on a second edition. Dictionaries of living languages are never done.”

Besides showing off the diverse talent of HSU authors, the collection sends a broader message, said Gehr. “It makes HSU authors more accessible. Many people have something to say but they don’t see themselves as authors. This collection shows they can be published too.”

Oberlander agrees. The way he sees it, publishing is powerful. “Faculty, staff, students, and alumni have things to say. We want to help them be heard through books, because voices bound in books have timeless value.”

Anyone from the Humboldt State University community, including authors themselves, may submit the names of faculty, staff, students, and alumni using this form. Eligible works are published articles, books, book chapters, special issues of journals, substantive encyclopedia entries, poetry, musical compositions, audio recordings, film/video recordings, and art exhibition catalogs.

The HSU Authors Hall celebration is from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 28, in the Helen Everett Reading Room on the second floor. For more information on the event, go to the Library’s website.